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Shane Warne: Former Australian cricketer dies aged 52 | Cricket News

Shane Warne: Former Australian cricketer dies aged 52 |  Cricket News

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Shane Warne stunned the cricketing world in 1993 with a delivery that beat England batsman Mike Gatting at Old Trafford

Shane Warne stunned the cricketing world in 1993 with a delivery that beat England batsman Mike Gatting at Old Trafford

Legendary Australian cricketer Shane Warne, one of history’s greatest bowlers, has died aged 52.

Warne’s management released a statement saying he died of a suspected heart attack in Koh Samui, Thailand.

The statement read: “Shane was found unresponsive at his villa and despite the best efforts of medical staff he could not be revived.

“The family requests confidentiality at this time and will provide further details in due course.”

The England cricket team are silent alongside the West Indies president's XI out of respect following the death of Australian cricketer Shane Warne.

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The England cricket team are silent alongside the West Indies president’s XI out of respect following the death of Australian cricketer Shane Warne.

The England cricket team are silent alongside the West Indies president’s XI out of respect following the death of Australian cricketer Shane Warne.

Leg spinner Warne is the second highest wicket taker in the history of Test cricket with 708 wickets in 145 matches, behind Sri Lankan Muttiah Muralitharan’s total of 800.

Warne won 1,001 international wickets in total, having also won 293 in 194 one-day internationals.

Warne will forever be remembered for producing the ‘Ball of the Century’ to fire Mike Gatting at Old Trafford in 1993 and he took 195 wickets at 11.25pm, with 11 five-fors and four 10-wicket match runs, against England.

His impact on the game saw him named as one of five Wisden Cricketers of the Century, alongside Sir Donald Bradman, Sir Garfield Sobers, Sir Jack Hobbs and Sir Viv Richards.

Since retiring from the game in 2013, he has worked as a pundit for sky sports and coached London Spirit on the inaugural edition of The Hundred in 2021.

Warne had tweeted earlier on Friday to pay tribute to Rod Marsh after the former Australian wicketkeeper died of a heart attack at the age of 74.

Warne played England domestic cricket for Hampshire, while his entire top-class Australian domestic cricket career was spent playing for his hometown of Victoria.

He led the Rajasthan Royals to the Indian Premier League title in 2008 and was named the team’s mentor in 2018.

The sports world paid tribute to Warne, with greats like Sir Viv Richards and Kumar Sangakkara among those expressing their shock and sadness.

Indian great Sachin Tendulkar declared himself “shocked, stunned and miserable” by the news. Tweeting a photo of the pair together at the Lord’s Bicentenary game in 2014, Tendulkar added: “I will miss you Warnie. There was never a dull moment with you around, on or off the pitch. I will always cherish our duels on and off the pitch. You always had a special place for India and Indians had a special place for you.

The England men’s team observed a minute’s silence at their training base in Antigua in tribute to Warne and posted their tributes on social media.

Warn in numbers

708 – wickets for Warne in his 145 Tests, behind Sri Lankan star Muralitharan’s 800 but well ahead of third England designer James Anderson (640).

1,001 – Warne took a further 293 wickets in one-day internationals to break four figures for Australia in all formats – again only behind Muralitharan in the international record books.

99 – Warne’s highest test score as a hitter – he has the most tests of any batsman to fail a century.

8-71 – his career-best figures in all first-class and limited cricket, in a 1994 Test against England in Brisbane.

195 – Ashes wickets, the most in competition history and 38 more than second-placed Glenn McGrath.

96 – Warne’s Test wicket tally in 2005, including 40 in a memorable Ashes series, remains a record for a player in a single calendar year. Muralitharan is closest behind him with 90 in 2006.

46 – 46 hat tricks in testing

‘Warne always had a smile on his face’

Shane Warne celebrates on the shoulders of Andrew Symonds and Matthew Hayden after Australia win the 2006 Melbourne Test

Shane Warne celebrates on the shoulders of Andrew Symonds and Matthew Hayden after Australia win the 2006 Melbourne Test

Sky Sports News’ James Cole, of Antigua with England:

There was a strange response on the pitch as the news circulated both among the media, the fans watching here and also the players. I understand that the players are in shock in this locker room. Mark Wood walked past me and he just gave me a nod and you could just tell there was a feeling of huge, huge sadness.

In terms of numbers and what he achieved, this ball of the century knocked out Gatting – one of the greatest moments in Test cricket. Iconic.

708 Test wickets, over 1,000 international wickets, much of the Ashes’ English rivalry, but he’s always been fair. He played hard but he was always fair. He was a good sportsman.

I remember Ashes 2005, he always had a smile on his face, a wry smile. He was good friends with Kevin Pietersen, but he knew where the line was.

A huge character, I dealt with him quite a bit during his commentator days. He was always nice, he always had time for you, and there was no ego in it.

It’s just extremely shocking, at just 52 years old, coming so close to the news that Rod Marsh had died last night, here our time. It’s a double shock.

There is a huge sense of shock here on the pitch, felt by everyone here, including the England dressing room. Everyone really feels that cricket has become insignificant and has lost an absolute legend and for many a genius of the game.

Shane Warne celebrates Australia's 1999 World Cup triumph

Shane Warne celebrates Australia’s 1999 World Cup triumph

Players from both sides observed a minute of silence. Ben Stokes was particularly moved, his head in his hands. Shane Warne, a man Stokes would have known well from his IPL experience.

Warne had a very smart cricketing brain. You don’t take that many wickets without being very, very smart.

You wonder if he had been a great captain, but maybe his character didn’t fit the way Australians see their captain; they still love their captain as a drummer and a very serious man.

But he had a brilliant cricketing brain and that’s why he was such a good pundit and commentator after cricket because he saw things that others might not have seen, even the captains on the ground. He always offered brilliant analysis when he worked for Skky and like I said he was always so fun.

Let’s not forget his influence in the county game either, he was captain at Hampshire and had a close relationship with a number of those players including Kevin Pietersen.

Legend is a word that is often used but never more appropriate. He’s a gaming legend in every way.

Trott: It was an honor to play against him

Jonathan Trott speaking to Sky Sports News

You hope it’s fake news or something. It’s hard to take, really, and hard to believe. It’s really, really sad.

Whether you are an Aussie cricket fan or a cricket lover, you couldn’t help but be glued to TV or loving to watch it. He was pure genius and it was an honor to play against him.

It was just the way he carried himself, he had an aura around him, he was a pure student of the game. He would tell anyone about the game, help anyone, and was always ready to talk and to listen, to share his advice and his experiences.

Compton: Warne saved Test cricket

English drummer Nick Compton paid tribute to Shane Warne, describing him as

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English drummer Nick Compton paid tribute to Shane Warne, describing him as “the greatest”.

English drummer Nick Compton paid tribute to Shane Warne, describing him as “the greatest”.

England drummer Nick Compton speaking to Sky Sports News

His character and his personality, his ability to be real and authentic are words that come to mind.

His ability to adapt and grow as a player, his consistency over a long period. There are plenty of bowlers and batsmen who have come onto the scene and had good streaks here and there, but he has done it time and time again.

The longevity of his career, his wickets, his records, all of that can be put aside. The way it ignited the game of cricket, Test cricket for many years was under threat, it’s a game that requires skill but it’s a game that requires characters to sustain it.

When I think back to Test Cricket there is no doubt that Shane Warne is one of the first names that comes to mind and one of the main reasons I wanted to go on and reach some of the heights I he has achieved.